Two more endangered red wolf puppies were born at the North Carolina Zoo

title=wpil_keyword_linkRed Cubs were recently born at the North Carolina Zoo. They are named after a zookeeper who died last year.” title=”Two more Red Cubs were recently born at the North Carolina Zoo. They are named after a zookeeper who died last year.” loading=”lazy”/>

Two more Red Cubs were recently born at the North Carolina Zoo. They are named after a zookeeper who died last year.

North Carolina Zoo

The North Carolina Zoo recently welcomed more endangered Cubs to its pack.

The two females puppies were born at the zoo May 4 to his mother Taylor and father Solo, the zoo said in a press release Thursday. This is the second litter born at the zoo this year and the first time two litters have been born there during the same season.

The puppies join five others born on April 21, according to the zoo. They are all “in good health and doing well”.

The most recent puppies have special names: Arrow and May. They are named after Jessi Culbertson, a former zookeeper who worked with red wolves at the zoo for years before passing away in 2019 from cancer.

Red wolf puppies NC zoo 2.jpeg
Two more Red Cubs were recently born at the North Carolina Zoo. They are named after a zookeeper who died last year. North Carolina Zoo

The name Arrow pays homage to Culbertson’s Native American heritage and the name May comes from the month she and the puppies were born.

With the latest additions, the zoo’s red wolf pack now numbers 27 wolves, the second largest pack in the country.

The the species is endangered since 1967 and its population was “decimated” in the early 20th century due to habitat destruction and alteration and “intensive predator control programs,” according to the US Fish and Wildlife Service. They were declared “biologically extinct” in the wild in 1980.

Now, about 15 to 20 remain in the wild, all in eastern North Carolina, the zoo said in the release.

The National Wildlife Service launched the American Red Wolf Recovery Program, which the zoo joined in 1994, to track and protect wolves, the statement said.

Since then, the zoo has bred 36 red wolves, 13 of which were born in the past three years, the statement said. About 240 of the wolves are in breeding programs across the country.

The new puppies will have minimal contact with zoo staff and will be kept in a quiet, blind area of ​​the zoo so that their mothers can raise them in a natural habitat with little stress, the release said.

The zoo is still closed to the public due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Susi H. Hamilton, secretary of the North Carolina Department of Natural and Cultural Resources, said in the statement that the zoo’s efforts have helped the species survive.

“It really is a testament to the dedication, teamwork and passion of the staff to help one of the most endangered canines in the world,” Hamilton said, according to the statement.

This story was originally published May 28, 2020 3:19 pm.

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Bailey Aldridge is a reporter who covers real-time news in North and South Carolina. She graduated in journalism from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.


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