Endangered red wolf delivered to WNC Nature Center

Endangered red wolf delivered to WNC Nature Center in hopes of saving the species

A gift and a promise to keep a critically endangered species alive has arrived in western North Carolina. The WNC Nature Center welcomed the red wolf M2235, also known as Ben, to Asheville on November 20, the centre’s marketing director Kate Frost said in a statement. Ben was airlifted to Asheville Regional Airport from New Jersey aboard a 1982 Piper Saratoga by pilot Michael Schneider, founder and executive director of the nonprofit Pilots To The Rescue . “We’re best known for our work with cats and dogs,” Schneider said, “but it’s a real privilege to be able to transfer an endangered species like this red wolf.” Rebecca Bose, curator from the Wolf Conservation Center, in South Salem, New York, came on the trip to Asheville to ensure the safe transport of the Red Wolf. Ben was born at WCC in 2018. For the past three years he had been living from the exhibition with his mother, father and siblings. Once Ben is successfully quarantined, he will be placed with another wolf, Karma, for company until a new mating partner is transferred to the WNC Nature Center. Karma will be moving from the center to the Endangered Wolf Center in Eureka, Missouri, in the spring. Erin Oldread, animal curator at the WNC Nature Center, explained why animals like Ben are so precious. In October, US Fish and Wildlife estimated that there were only 15 to 17 red wolves living in the wild in eastern North Carolina. “Most people don’t realize how critically endangered red wolves are or how they can only be found in the wild in one place in the world,” Oldread said. She said there were 241 red wolves living under human care in places like the WNC Nature Center. The WNC Nature Center has been involved in the US red wolf recovery program since 1990 when they first began exhibiting red wolves. Between 1996 and 2014, 13 puppies were born at the Nature Center. Donations can be made online at www.wildwnc.org/donate or mailed to Friends of the WNC Nature Center, PO Box 19151, Asheville, NC, 28815. Donations of $ 100 or more will be matched up to $ 2,500 from Weiler Woods for Wildlife, a red wolf conservation partner with the Friends of the WNC Center, until the end of the year.

A gift and a promise to keep a critically endangered species alive has arrived in western North Carolina.

The WNC Nature Center welcomed Red Wolf M2235, also known as Ben, to Asheville on Nov. 20, the centre’s marketing director Kate Frost said in a statement.

Ben was flown to Asheville Regional Airport from New Jersey aboard a 1982 Piper Saratoga by pilot Michael Schneider, founder and executive director of the nonprofit Pilots To The Rescue.

Ben the Red Wolf arriving in Asheville

“We’re best known for our work with cats and dogs,” Schneider said, “but it’s a real privilege to be able to transfer an endangered species like this red wolf.”

Rebecca Bose, curator of Wolf Conservation Center, in South Salem, New York, came for the trip to Asheville to ensure the safe transport of the red wolf.

Ben was born at the WCC in 2018. For the past three years, he has lived on show with his mother, father and siblings.

Once Ben is successfully quarantined, he will be placed with another wolf, Karma, for company until a new mating partner is transferred to the WNC Nature Center.

Karma will be moving from the center to the Endangered Wolf Center in Eureka, Missouri, in the spring.

Erin Oldread, animal curator at the WNC Nature Center, explained why animals like Ben are so precious.

Ben the Red Wolf

In October, US Fish and Wildlife estimated that there were only 15 to 17 red wolves living in the wild in eastern North Carolina.

“Most people don’t realize how critically endangered red wolves are or how they can only be found in the wild in one place in the world,” Oldread said.

She said there are 241 red wolves living under human care in places like the WNC Nature Center. The WNC Nature Center has been involved in the US red wolf recovery program since 1990 when they first began exhibiting red wolves. Between 1996 and 2014, 13 puppies were born at the Nature Center.

Donations can be made online at www.wildwnc.org/donate or mailed to Friends of the WNC Nature Center, PO Box 19151, Asheville, NC, 28815. Gifts of $ 100 or more will be matched up to $ 2,500 by Weiler Woods for Wildlife, a red wolf conservation partner with the friends of the WNC Center, until the end of the year.


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