Canine – SOTW Metal http://sotwmetal.com/ Sun, 24 Oct 2021 12:05:37 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://sotwmetal.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/09/sotw-150x150.png Canine – SOTW Metal http://sotwmetal.com/ 32 32 “From Broken Situations to Confident Dogs”: How to Cope with Canine Trauma https://sotwmetal.com/from-broken-situations-to-confident-dogs-how-to-cope-with-canine-trauma/ https://sotwmetal.com/from-broken-situations-to-confident-dogs-how-to-cope-with-canine-trauma/#respond Wed, 20 Oct 2021 18:40:52 +0000 https://sotwmetal.com/from-broken-situations-to-confident-dogs-how-to-cope-with-canine-trauma/ When Heather Watling saw a fellow animal rescuer’s post online about a large pet rescue taking place near Brantford in early October, she offered to help. Watling drove five hours from Sudbury, where his organization, 4Champ Animal Rescue, is based, to a house in Burford. An owner had died and the 52 dogs, four cats […]]]>

When Heather Watling saw a fellow animal rescuer’s post online about a large pet rescue taking place near Brantford in early October, she offered to help. Watling drove five hours from Sudbury, where his organization, 4Champ Animal Rescue, is based, to a house in Burford. An owner had died and the 52 dogs, four cats and a turtle who lived there needed care and shelter.

The rescue – initiated by Cassia Bryden who works part-time at Hillside Kennels, who received a tip from the police and contacted several organizations, including Watling’s – involved luring the dogs for a week. According to Bryden, some came when called; others had to be removed using leashes and a catch pole or coyote traps – they were “fighting for their lives” not to leave the house, she says.

Some had wounds, overgrown fingernails and missing fur. “I’ve traveled all over northern Ontario and northern Manitoba… and I’ve never seen anything like it,” says Watling, who has taken in three of the animals. “Anyone can pretty much imagine what 52 dogs would look like in a small house. “

The owner handed the animals over to Bryden and his rescue organization, Sato Saved End of the Line Dog Rescue, located in Innerkip. Hillside Kennels has welcomed the dogs until foster families and other rescues can.

While many dogs will need care for their physical injuries before they find a new permanent home, Watling says she is more worried about their mental health; its 4Champ Animal Rescue, founded in 2015, specializes in dogs with serious behavior problems that need to be trained before they can be safely adopted.

“More people need to realize that these dogs also deserve a chance because they are always great dogs,” said Bryden. “They just haven’t reached their potential yet.”

But dogs with behavioral issues are often the last on adoption lists – or offered for adoption multiple times, Watling says. TVO.org asked him how his team deals with rescue dogs who have suffered trauma and what potential adopters need to know.

TVO.org: What are your animal welfare concerns when you see something like the situation in Burford?

Heather Watling: Of course there are the physical ailments, but we have amazing vets who can fix them. This is the sequel. It’s the mental trauma that these dogs went through and will continue to go through because they’ve now gone from the only life they’ve known inside this house to just being outside, and the exterior alone freaked out some of them. Mental illness in dogs is just as common as it is in humans. It just goes unnoticed.

TVO.org: What happens to dogs once they are out of a hoarding situation?

Watling: Every dog ​​is different. Some will have anxiety disorders. Some will be completely closed. Others will redirect their anxiety or depression to people or other dogs. Some dogs will not display anything until later. After a few months, once they feel comfortable in their new situation, problems may start to arise.

TVO.org: If you save a dog that you think has suffered some sort of mental trauma, what do you do?

Watling: The first thing we will discuss is their physical condition, because we believe that we cannot keep them mentally healthy until they are physically healthy. We will observe the dog at the start. We don’t do much with them. We don’t pay a lot of attention. It’s more simply a matter of observing them, then trying to understand what they are feeling and what they are going through.

In cases like this, we will not be pushing these dogs. We allow them to choose to work with us. We give them the necessary basics: routine, structure. And we allow them to choose to work with us. For example, one of our dogs at the moment is still very scared and spends most of his time hiding behind the chair in his room. Thus, the sponsor and one of our volunteers will simply sit down in the room, offer him treats and allow him to choose to approach.

TVO.org: So be patient the same way you could be with a person.

Watling: Exactly. We take it the same way. We’re just communicating on a different level.

TVO.org: In general, how long does it take for a dog to recover from a negative situation like this?

Watling: It can really vary. We have had dogs in the past that have recovered quite quickly. We had one that came from a Korean meat market that we had for 80 days before it was even ready to walk on a leash outside. It really depends on each dog, their age and the trauma they have suffered. Often we don’t know what this trauma is.

Lucy, a bitch from the Burford Rescue, with her foster family. (Facebook / Cassia Bryden)

TVO.org: How does your team determine when a dog is ready for adoption?

Watling: When the dog can begin to lead a normal life in the foster home, that’s when we start discussing whether he’s ready to come home. Then we’re usually going to push it a bit further, maybe a few weeks down the road, to make sure they’re really displaying normal doggy behaviors and emotions.

TVO.org: What are some of these normal behaviors and emotions that you are looking for?

Watling: For these dogs, I want them to be able to get in and out of the house without panicking outside the door. The door is an important thing with these dogs, because they had not been outside. So stepping through the door into a whole new environment is terrifying for a lot of these guys. We want them to come in and out happily through the door. We want them to happily fit into their cages, eat regular meals, and show happiness and joy when their host family walks into the room or comes home. And, of course, we always make sure our vet is also on board to say, “Yes, this dog is ready. “

TVO.org: How do you let people know what a dog’s needs are without scaring them?

Watling: This is a discussion that we have had several times in the team. The reality is, we are brutally honest about the safety of our dogs, as well as the public and the family. We will let people know directly, directly on their posts, if they have a bite history. If they’re afraid of new strangers, we’ll make that clear. It takes longer for these dogs to be adopted. But there are families who want to welcome dogs like that. Everyone sees these medical cases, broken legs, injuries, and everyone wants them, but then they don’t see dogs that are emotionally or mentally broken with the same value.

TVO.org: If people are interested in a dog with mental health needs, what should they ask themselves when considering adoption?

Watling: They absolutely have to be sure it’s something they want to do. I wouldn’t suggest bringing a dog that has a history of biting or, say, severe generalized anxiety into a home with young children, as it’s just a bad combination. You should know that this dog is going to take time. You have to have the determination, the time and, to be honest, the funds.

TVO.org: When you talk about funds, is that to make sure you can pay for any type of accommodation or training?

Watling: Yes, from meds to training to training supplies to crates – whatever it takes to get this dog going.

TVO.org: If someone thinks their pet might need some help with their mental health, what would you recommend as a next step?

Watling: The first thing would be to contact their veterinarian to make sure there is no underlying chemical imbalance or underlying pain causing this behavior, then contact a certified behaviorist or trainer to working with anxious or aggressive dogs. .

TVO.org: What are some positive things people can hope to get out of their relationship with a dog who has special requirements?

Watling: Honestly what we see a lot is loyalty. These dogs are so loyal to what we call owners, whether it is the adopter or the person at home who does the majority of the training. It is loyalty. We see a lot of them, because these dogs are brought from broken situations to confident dogs, and they are loyal to the person who brought them there.

TVO.org: Is there anything we haven’t talked about that you wanted to add?

Watling: We really want the public to know that mental health is just as important as physical health. They go hand in hand. Your dog can be as physically fit as possible while showing signs of what you might think is an illness when, in reality, they are symptoms of mental illness. It is so crucial.

This interview has been condensed and edited for length and clarity.

Ontario hubs are made possible by the Barry and Laurie Green Family Charitable Trust and Goldie Feldman.


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Book review | Improbable Friendships: Dogs: 37 Stories of Canine Compassion and Courage https://sotwmetal.com/book-review-improbable-friendships-dogs-37-stories-of-canine-compassion-and-courage/ https://sotwmetal.com/book-review-improbable-friendships-dogs-37-stories-of-canine-compassion-and-courage/#respond Fri, 01 Oct 2021 12:04:00 +0000 https://sotwmetal.com/book-review-improbable-friendships-dogs-37-stories-of-canine-compassion-and-courage/ The past week has been a bad week for animal lovers. First, the Houston SPCA found a German Shepherd north of Greenspoint with his muzzle closed, perforated tumors and a crushed skull. Then BBC News circulated the x-ray of a buried alive dog with a huge nail in the head. So when good dog news […]]]>

The past week has been a bad week for animal lovers. First, the Houston SPCA found a German Shepherd north of Greenspoint with his muzzle closed, perforated tumors and a crushed skull. Then BBC News circulated the x-ray of a buried alive dog with a huge nail in the head.

So when good dog news hits our office, we’re ready for the respite. Improbable Friendships: Dogs: 37 Stories of Canine Compassion and Courage is the last of New York Times Best-selling author Jennifer S. Holland.

She’s there National Geographic writer who has traveled the world in search of stories about animal relations, channeling her passion into books about friendships, loves and heroes. It’s a formula that works: wellness stories paired with great photography, organized into short chapters that don’t take a lot of time to read but really give a boost when you need a boost. thumb.

Fans will be happy to hear that there are 28 new stories, plus a handful of classics, in this latest book. Like the story of Lilo the Siberian Husky, who fought against primitive “inner wolf” urges, originally mistaking small animals for prey. Over time, she mellowed, especially when her owners (three sisters) continued to save all those wild kittens in the neighborhood. One little one in particular – Rosie, barely two or three weeks old – didn’t want to eat or lift her head until Lilo became motherly and looked after her; they have been quick friends ever since.

Or the story of little Roo, a two-legged chihuahua who was adopted by a woman who had recently rescued a Silkie (a breed of chicken native to China) from a science lab. The animals immediately mistook each other as long-lost siblings of the Isle of the Misfits: the fluffy white bird with soft plumage wearing a diaper and the cute Roo as a button running through its own special cart.

Holland has a knack for finding the most unusual friendships: the dogs in the book have become best friends with a goose, ferret, chameleon, coyote, turtle, monkey, and even a pygmy owl. There are heroic stories in which dogs saved the lives of other dogs, humans and even horses.

Some of the favorite classics Holland brought back include the story of Zoe the Dalmatian and her spotted friend Lambie, Naki’o the bionic dog, who lost all four of his paws to frostbite, and the fox and dog pair from hunt who have become nap buddies.

Holland will be in Houston on November 14 for a school event in association with Blue Willow Bookshop. Returning to the local story of the German Shepherd found on October 17 at the intersection of Rushcreek Drive and Spears Road, the Houston SPCA were unable to save her and she was humanely euthanized. Changing society’s perception that dogs and cats are disposable starts with the next generation, so book events like this are a great start to teaching compassion and empathy.

“The Houston SPCA is calling for justice on behalf of this victim of cruelty. A reward of $ 5,000 is offered for any information leading to the arrest and conviction of the person (s) responsible for the cruel acts against this dog. known about the matter should be reported to the Houston SPCA at 713-869-7722 or Precinct One at 713-755-7628. ”

To purchase copies of Holland’s new book, visit Blue Willow Bookshop, 14532 Memorial Drive, 281-497-8675, bluewillowbookshop.com. $ 13.95.


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Jaws of death: how the canines of carnivorous mammals evolved into super-killers https://sotwmetal.com/jaws-of-death-how-the-canines-of-carnivorous-mammals-evolved-into-super-killers/ https://sotwmetal.com/jaws-of-death-how-the-canines-of-carnivorous-mammals-evolved-into-super-killers/#respond Thu, 16 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://sotwmetal.com/jaws-of-death-how-the-canines-of-carnivorous-mammals-evolved-into-super-killers/ Carnivorous animals come in all shapes and sizes, from the 500 gram quoll to the 500 kilogram polar bear. This disparate group of mammals share a common characteristic: canines in the front of their jaws. The canines are long and pointed, with a sharp point and, in some cases, blade edges. These formidable weapons are […]]]>

Carnivorous animals come in all shapes and sizes, from the 500 gram quoll to the 500 kilogram polar bear. This disparate group of mammals share a common characteristic: canines in the front of their jaws.

The canines are long and pointed, with a sharp point and, in some cases, blade edges. These formidable weapons are what make carnivores such effective killers. In fact, our new research released today reveals how evolution has shaped dogs into unique shapes suited to the lifestyle of each predator.

We applied cutting-edge 3D methods to measure the canines of more than 60 predators, including lions, cheetahs, grizzly bears, dingoes and Tasmanian devils. The research represents the first comprehensive analysis of canine tooth shape in predatory mammals.

We have found that canine teeth have evolved in special ways to help each species kill and eat their favorite prey, helping to make mammals one of nature’s most efficient predators.

When carnivorous mammals growl, they reveal four long canines in the front of their jaws – two at the top and two at the bottom. These teeth are the first point of contact between predator and prey and are used to stab, kill, and dismember a socket.

Not all carnivores have the same diet. Grizzly bears eat meat, fruits, and plants, while meerkats feed primarily on invertebrates like scorpions and beetles. Big cats, like cheetahs, stick to meat.

Carnivores can kill in multiple ways as well. Tigers smother their prey with a targeted bite to the throat, while wolves use multiple sharp bites to tear their prey apart. Small canids such as the red fox scramble and violently shake their prey, while wolverines can kill with a single crushing skull bite.

There has been little research on the associations between the shape, function and evolution of canine teeth. Our research aimed to determine which canine shapes best suit the diet of each predator.

We scanned and compared the canines of over 60 carnivores, including tigers, coyotes, polar bears, wolverines, raccoons, and even quolls. We then examined the association between canine shape and function.

We have found that the shape of the teeth varies depending on the types of food a carnivore bites in on a regular basis, just as we choose different kitchen knives based on what we want to cut.

Big cats such as lions, tigers, and cheetahs have some of the sharpest canines in the animal kingdom. These long, dagger-like weapons are used to stab – bite deep into the throats of prey to bring them down.

Take a 3D look at a cheetah’s canines in the interactive below.

Other species, such as the coyote and the red fox, have slender, curved canines. These teeth act as hooks to help hold small prey and prevent them from sliding out of the mouth when shaking.

Animals that eat a lot of “soft” prey, or those that bite the throat, often have thin, pointed canines. The sharp tips make a crack in the prey and when the animal bites, the long, sharp edges of the tooth help to penetrate deep into the socket.

Species with harder or more varied diets have strong, sturdy teeth that do not break when cracking bones or other hard foods. These species include scavengers such as the Tasmanian devil and generalists such as the honey badger.

The bluntest upper canine tips we have examined belong to the crab-eating mongoose. As the name suggests, the species feeds on crabs and other hard prey such as reptiles, snails, and insects.

We have also found canine teeth with blunt tips and edges in animals that kill their prey with crushing skull bites, such as the American swallow or wolverine. Blunt tips are better able than sharp tips to withstand the stresses produced by such heavy force.

Research is helping to make new connections between tooth shape and ecology that may shed light on the diet and behavior of extinct species.

For example, the thylacine (or Tasmanian tiger) had curved canines, suggesting that it may have grabbed and shaken smaller prey. This supports recent research on thylacine skull shape which found that, unlike previous theories, thylacine likely hunted small preys rather than large ones.

By studying canine teeth closely, we discovered how evolution has shaped even the smallest animals to fit the niches they fill in nature.

(This story was not edited by Devdiscourse staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)


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how the canines of carnivorous mammals evolved into super-killers https://sotwmetal.com/how-the-canines-of-carnivorous-mammals-evolved-into-super-killers/ https://sotwmetal.com/how-the-canines-of-carnivorous-mammals-evolved-into-super-killers/#respond Wed, 15 Sep 2021 20:04:51 +0000 https://sotwmetal.com/how-the-canines-of-carnivorous-mammals-evolved-into-super-killers/ Carnivorous animals come in all shapes and sizes, from the 500 gram quoll to the 500 kilogram polar bear. This disparate group of mammals share a common characteristic: canines in the front of their jaws. The canines are long and pointed, with a sharp point and, in some cases, blade edges. These formidable weapons are […]]]>

Carnivorous animals come in all shapes and sizes, from the 500 gram quoll to the 500 kilogram polar bear. This disparate group of mammals share a common characteristic: canines in the front of their jaws.

The canines are long and pointed, with a sharp point and, in some cases, blade edges. These formidable weapons are what make carnivores such effective killers. In fact, our new research released today reveals how evolution has shaped dogs into unique shapes suited to the lifestyle of each predator.

We applied state-of-the-art 3D methods to measure the canines of more than 60 predators, including lions, cheetahs, grizzly bears, dingoes and Tasmanian devils. The research represents the first comprehensive analysis of canine tooth shape in predatory mammals.

We have found that canine teeth have evolved in special ways to help each species kill and eat their favorite prey, helping to make mammals one of nature’s most efficient predators.

A lion, a meerkat, a grizzly bear and an African wild dog carrying their canines.
Lion Petr Ganaj, Meerkat Joshua J. Cotten, Grizzly Mana520, African Wild Dog Matt Burke via Unsplash

Born to kill

When carnivorous mammals growl, they reveal four long canines in the front of their jaws – two at the top and two at the bottom. These teeth are the first point of contact between predator and prey, and are used to stab, kill, and dismember a socket.

Not all carnivores have the same diet. Grizzly bears eat meat, fruits, and plants, while meerkats feed primarily on invertebrates like scorpions and beetles. Big cats, like cheetahs, stick to meat.

Carnivores can kill in multiple ways as well. Tigers smother their prey with a targeted bite to the throat, while wolves use multiple sharp bites to tear their prey apart. Small canids such as the red fox scramble and violently shake their prey, while wolverines can kill with a single crushing skull bite.

There has been little research on the associations between the shape, function and evolution of canine teeth. Our research aimed to determine which canine shapes are best for each predator diet.



Read more: New research reveals animals are changing their body shape to cope with climate change


Lion using his long, sharp, dagger-shaped canines to inflict a targeted bite to the neck and slaughter an Oryx in the Kalahari Desert.
Lion Canids Mike van den Bos and Thomas Evans Hunt both via Unsplash

A bite worse than its bark

We scanned and compared the canines of over 60 carnivores, including tigers, coyotes, polar bears, wolverines, raccoons, and even quolls. We then examined the association between canine shape and function.

We have found that the shape of the teeth varies depending on the types of food a carnivore bites in on a regular basis, just as we choose different kitchen knives based on what we want to cut.

Big cats such as lions, tigers, and cheetahs have some of the sharpest canines in the animal kingdom. These long, dagger-like weapons are used to stab – bite deep into the throats of prey to bring them down.

Take a 3D look at a cheetah’s canines in the interactive below.

Other species, such as the coyote and the red fox, have slender, curved canines. These teeth act as hooks to help hold small prey and prevent them from sliding out of the mouth when shaking.

Animals that eat a lot of “soft” prey, or those that bite the throat, often have thin, pointed canines. The sharp tips make a crack in the prey and when the animal bites, the long, sharp edges of the tooth help to penetrate deep into the socket.

Species with harder or more varied diets have strong, sturdy teeth that do not break when cracking bones or other hard foods. These species include scavengers such as the Tasmanian devil and generalists such as the honey badger.

The bluntest upper canine tips we have examined belong to the crab-eating mongoose. As the name suggests, the species feeds on crabs and other hard prey such as reptiles, snails, and insects.

We have also found canine teeth with blunt tips and edges in animals that kill their prey with crushing skull bites, such as the American swallow or wolverine. Blunt tips are better able than sharp tips to withstand the stresses produced by such heavy force.

Canines can be long and sharp, thin and curved, or blunt and sturdy. These differences are related to the way these teeth are used during hunting and feeding.
Image by Tahlia Pollock

Something to chew on

Research is helping to make new connections between tooth shape and ecology that may shed light on the diet and behavior of extinct species.

For example, the thylacine (or Tasmanian tiger) had curved canines, suggesting that it may have grabbed and shaken smaller prey. This supports recent research on thylacine skull shape which found that, unlike previous theories, thylacine likely hunted small preys rather than large ones.

By studying canine teeth closely, we discovered how evolution has shaped even the smallest animals to fit the niches they fill in nature.



Read more: Who would win in a fight between a short-tailed eagle and a bald eagle? It’s a close call for two nationally revered birds



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Arizona high school dog mascots: what’s in there? https://sotwmetal.com/arizona-high-school-dog-mascots-whats-in-there/ https://sotwmetal.com/arizona-high-school-dog-mascots-whats-in-there/#respond Mon, 30 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://sotwmetal.com/arizona-high-school-dog-mascots-whats-in-there/ Arizona high school dog mascots are fairly well represented statewide. While there might not be a ton of canine mascots in Arizona high schools, we’re still going to be following them, just like we have for animal mascots across the country. Plus, we just recapped the animal mascots, bird mascots, and feline mascots in Arizona, […]]]>

Arizona high school dog mascots are fairly well represented statewide.

While there might not be a ton of canine mascots in Arizona high schools, we’re still going to be following them, just like we have for animal mascots across the country. Plus, we just recapped the animal mascots, bird mascots, and feline mascots in Arizona, if you wanted to take a look.

We have used Mascot DB as our primary source and apologize if we omitted your school or misspelled it.

There aren’t a lot of dog mascots, which is a bit odd. Arizona high school sports and activities are governed by the Arizona Interschool Association, with the largest schools in 6A and smallest in 1A.

What Arizona High School Dog Mascots Are There?

The most numerous of the Arizona High School canine mascots are the wolves or a variation of it, with 14 schools using this mascot: Apache Trail Wolf Pack, Arizona Cultural (Phoenix), Avondale La Joya Fighting Lobos, Chandler, Goodyear Estrella Foothills, Many Farms Lobos, Patagonia Lobos, Sahuarita Walden Grove Red wolves, Scottsdale Desert Mountain, Snowflake Lobos, Tempe Compadre Lobos, Tucson Alta Vista Lobos, Tucson St Augustine and Winkleman Hayden Lobos, while Clarkdale also used this moniker.

There are a dozen Bulldogs cruising around the state, at Arizona Charter (Surprise), Douglas, Kingman, Mesa Superstition, Queen Creek, Peoria Accelerated, Phoenix Goldwater, Phoenix Bostrom, Phoenix Sierra Linda, Safford, Scottsdale BASIS, and Winslow.

Five coyote groups exist in Arizona Lutheran (Phoenix), Mesa Skyline, Peoria Centennial, San Tan Valley Combs, and Sedona Verde Valley, while it was also in use at Phoenix Union, which is now closed. Maybe this was inspired by Wile E Coyote of the Looney Tunes, or the Arizona Coyotes of the NHL?

Anthem Caurus, Chandler Hamilton, Gilbert Campo Verde, and Scottsdale Horizon are all home to Huskies – except for alliteration, that doesn’t make much sense geographically, as a double-coated dog wouldn’t do very well in the heat. of the desert.

Good luck to all the school sports teams this year, and stay safe.


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“Riverdale” Recap: Season 5, Episode 13 – “Reservoir Canine” https://sotwmetal.com/riverdale-recap-season-5-episode-13-reservoir-canine/ https://sotwmetal.com/riverdale-recap-season-5-episode-13-reservoir-canine/#respond Thu, 26 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://sotwmetal.com/riverdale-recap-season-5-episode-13-reservoir-canine/ Want to catch up? Learn our earlier Riverdale summarize here. Betty and Tabitha launched a killer prevention truck draw this week Riverdale – and of course, it was about making an evocative song and turning on the degree. Nonetheless, on her way to her missing sister Polly, Betty operates a large oil rig and tracks […]]]>


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Dogged lawyer delivers verdict of $ 22,000 for sheep, goats killed by dog https://sotwmetal.com/dogged-lawyer-delivers-verdict-of-22000-for-sheep-goats-killed-by-dog/ https://sotwmetal.com/dogged-lawyer-delivers-verdict-of-22000-for-sheep-goats-killed-by-dog/#respond Thu, 26 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://sotwmetal.com/dogged-lawyer-delivers-verdict-of-22000-for-sheep-goats-killed-by-dog/ Lawyer seeking compensation for more than a dozen sheep and several goats killed by marauding dog says jury award of $ 22,000, including $ 12,000 in attorney fees, falls short to be his greatest verdict. But, said Matthew Carlton, “This is the craziest case I have ever had. It was like high stakes poker all […]]]>

Lawyer seeking compensation for more than a dozen sheep and several goats killed by marauding dog says jury award of $ 22,000, including $ 12,000 in attorney fees, falls short to be his greatest verdict.

But, said Matthew Carlton, “This is the craziest case I have ever had. It was like high stakes poker all over the place.

In addition to focusing on what Carlton said is probably one of Georgia’s oldest laws, which places strict liability on dog owners who kill livestock, he also had to assess the value of dead animals: 16 sheep and three goats.

“They were Shetland sheep, apparently quite valuable, around $ 1,000 a piece,” he said. “Goats only cost about $ 100 – poor goats,” Carlton said of the Carlton Act of Decatur.

The Daily Report was unable to reach Julie Bigler, who owned the Catahoula’s leopard dog blamed for attacks, and a number for his Fairburn phone was out of service.

Bigler’s attorney, Ethenia King of the College Park Justice and Freedom Firm, said her client was exploring all of her options after the negative verdict.

According to Carlton and court documents, the attacks occurred on a farm in southern Fulton County that had belonged to a woman who later died of cancer; her brother and executor, Robert Dickens, took over and continued to lead it.

“There were sheep, goats, donkeys and a horse,” Carlton said.

The first attack took place in June 2018, when several sheep and goats were injured and a few sheep killed.

Dickens reported the attack to Fulton County Animal Control, and his brother set up motion-triggered camera traps that captured footage of a large orange dog chasing goats.

Two months later there was another trail and more dead animals; an animal control officer came out and Dickens told him they suspected the dog belonged to Bigler, who lived 2 miles away.

When the officer showed him photos of the dog, Bigler said it looked like his own and was “shocked,” Carlton said, as the dog’s enclosure was fenced and topped with barbed wire “like the Stalag. 13 ”.

Dog chasing a goat. (Courtesy photo)

Despite this, cameras captured another attack in December with footage showing the dog killing sheep and goats; grisly exhibits show the carcasses and injured animals and a large orange dog, apparently stained with blood, rampaging among the animals.

“These dogs are bred to hunt feral pigs,” Carlton said. “They are tough guys.”

Carlton said he wrote Bigler a letter asking him to pay for the dead animals.

“They blew me away, so I wrote another letter and they offered me around $ 900,” he said.

Dickens sued Bigler in Fulton County State Court.

During the trial, Bigler filed counterclaims, including slander and willful infliction of emotional distress; Dixon dismissed all claims for intentional infliction, but no counterclaim was included in the pre-trial order.

During the jury selection on Friday August 20, Carlton said the plaintiff offered $ 5,000 to settle the case.

“I said, ‘Offer $ 15,000 and I’ll tell my client to take it,’” he said.

During a two-day trial before Judge Myra Dixon, Carlton said Bigler claimed the photos were too blurry for her to confirm the dog’s identity.

When the animal control officer spoke, “the opponent’s lawyer started trying to ask him about coyotes, wolves and scavengers,” he said. “She said there were no wolves in Georgia and coyote sightings are extremely rare in southern Fulton County.”

“They also tried to argue that my client should have let the vet do an autopsy or DNA test,” he said. “It was overkill, like he was supposed to leave rotting animals lying around the farm while waiting to be tested.”

Carlton had included a request for attorney’s fees on the verdict form; After the evidence closed, Bigler’s attorney requested that the evidence be reopened so that she could also claim fees.

“The judge agrees, says she will allow him to reopen the evidence to present claims for emotional distress,” he said. “So I said, ‘I’m going to have to ask for the trial to be set aside. “

After speaking with his client, King said they would not pursue the counterclaim.

“I don’t think anyone wanted to try this case again,” he said.

On Tuesday, the jury took about an hour to award $ 10,000 in compensatory damages and $ 12,000 in costs and expenses.

What about the dog?

“I understand she had him pose,” he said. “It was not revealed at trial.”


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How your Labrador retriever’s yellow coat can reveal secrets about canine evolution https://sotwmetal.com/how-your-labrador-retrievers-yellow-coat-can-reveal-secrets-about-canine-evolution/ https://sotwmetal.com/how-your-labrador-retrievers-yellow-coat-can-reveal-secrets-about-canine-evolution/#respond Sat, 14 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://sotwmetal.com/how-your-labrador-retrievers-yellow-coat-can-reveal-secrets-about-canine-evolution/ The level of variation in dogs is simply astounding. It’s hard to believe when you look at them, but Great Danes and Chihuahuas are the same species despite being ten times the size and mass difference. Fur color patterns are also responsible for a rich palette of distinctive characteristics among different breeds. And, according to […]]]>

The level of variation in dogs is simply astounding. It’s hard to believe when you look at them, but Great Danes and Chihuahuas are the same species despite being ten times the size and mass difference. Fur color patterns are also responsible for a rich palette of distinctive characteristics among different breeds. And, according to a new study, these variations in fur coloring are due to genes inherited from a distant common ancestor of dogs and wolves.

The surprising connection between a yellow lab and a white wolf

Professor Danika Bannasch is a geneticist and veterinarian at the University of California, Davis, whose work focuses on identifying the molecular causes of inherited diseases in dogs and horses. While at the University of Bern in Switzerland, Bannasch had the idea to determine the fundamental genetic basis of black and tan coat colors in dogs. She quickly rallied other colleagues, including researchers affiliated with the HudsonAlpha Institute, experts in phylogenetics and structure of the coat of mammals.

Wolves and dogs make two different types of pigments: a black pigment called eumelanin and a yellow pigment called pheomelanin. Combining these two pigments at the right time and place in the dog’s body produces five main color patterns or phenotypes. In Bannasch’s study, these phenotypes are dominant yellow, shadow yellow, agouti, black saddle, and black back.

Within each pattern type there may be variation due to other factors including: (1) the position of the boundaries between the pheomelanic and eumelanic zones, for example in the black saddle or black back; (2) the shade of pheomelanin (red to almost white); (3) presence of a black face mask or white spots caused by genes other than A SIP; and (4) the length and / or curl of the pile. The patterns are displayed in order of dominance. Credit: Nature Ecologie et Evolution.

After sequencing the DNA of ancient dogs and wolves, the researchers found that the production of the yellow pigment is controlled by the agouti signaling protein, whose activity is in turn controlled by the ASIP gene. Mutations in two distinct areas of the ASIP gene lead to different coat patterns.

But what was very surprising was the fact that the ASIP gene has been around for at least two million years, long before the domestication of dogs around 30,000 years ago.

This gene comes from a now extinct canine that diverged from gray wolves, which is why the same genetic combination responsible for the dominant patterns of yellow coat is shared with arctic white wolves. The lighter coat was probably a beneficial adaptation to the extinct canine ancestor in an arctic environment, such as during ice ages between 1.5 and 2 million years ago. The coat pattern persisted and was eventually inherited by dogs and wolves.

“While we reflect on all of these coat color variations in dogs, some of them happened long before ‘dogs’ were dogs,” Bannasch said. “Genetics are proving to be much more interesting because they tell us something about the evolution of canids.”

“We were initially surprised to find that white wolves and yellow dogs have an almost identical ASIP DNA configuration,” added Chris Kaelin of the HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology in Huntsville, Alabama. “But we were even more surprised when it turned out that a specific DNA pattern was over 2 million years old, before modern wolves emerged as a species.”

Meanwhile, the black back pattern was identified in a 9,500-year-old dog sample, showing that the dogs had rich coat variations early on.

Bannasch actually has a black-backed Danish Swedish farm dog and two Nova Scotia duck scavengers with a dominant yellow pattern. Now she only needs three more coat designs to get the full set, she joked.

The results were reported in the journal Ecology and evolution of nature.


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canine genetic puzzle solved | Technological networks https://sotwmetal.com/canine-genetic-puzzle-solved-technological-networks/ https://sotwmetal.com/canine-genetic-puzzle-solved-technological-networks/#respond Fri, 13 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://sotwmetal.com/canine-genetic-puzzle-solved-technological-networks/ The inheritance of several coat color patterns in dogs has been the subject of controversial debate for decades. Researchers, including Tosso Leeb from the Institute of Genetics at the University of Bern, have finally been able to solve the riddle. Not only did they clarify how the coat color patterns are genetically controlled, but the […]]]>

The inheritance of several coat color patterns in dogs has been the subject of controversial debate for decades. Researchers, including Tosso Leeb from the Institute of Genetics at the University of Bern, have finally been able to solve the riddle. Not only did they clarify how the coat color patterns are genetically controlled, but the researchers also found that the light coat color in white arctic wolves and many modern dogs is due to a genetic variant native to a species that passed away a long time ago. The study has just been published in the scientific journal Nature Ecology and Evolution.

Two pigments and a “switch” for all coat colors

Wolves and dogs can make two different types of pigments, black, called eumelanin, and yellow, pheomelanin. Precisely regulated production of these two pigments at the right time and place on the body results in very different coat color patterns. Before the study, four different models had been recognized in dogs and several genetic variants had been theorized at the origin of these models. However, commercial genetic testing of these variants on several thousand dogs has yielded conflicting results, indicating that existing knowledge about the inheritance of coat color patterns is incomplete and not entirely correct.

During coat color formation, the agouti signaling protein is the body’s main switch for the production of pheomelanin yellow. If the agouti signaling protein is present, pigment-producing cells will synthesize yellow pheomelanin. If no agouti signaling protein is present, black eumelanin will be formed. “We realized very early on that the genetic variants responsible had to be regulatory variants which modulate the rate of protein production and lead to higher or lower amounts of agouti signal protein”, explains Tosso Leeb.

Five instead of four separate coat color patterns

The agouti signaling protein gene has several initiation sites for reading genetic information, called promoters. Dogs, on the one hand, have a ventral promoter, which is responsible for the production of the agouti signaling protein in the belly. On the other hand, dogs have an additional hair cycle specific promoter that mediates the production of the agouti signaling protein during specific stages of hair growth and allows for the formation of banded hair.

For the first time, researchers have characterized these two promoters in detail, in hundreds of dogs. They discovered two variants of the ventral promoter. One of the variants transmits the production of normal amounts of agouti signaling protein. The other variant has a higher activity and causes the production of an increased amount of agouti signaling protein. The researchers even identified three different variants of the hair cycle-specific promoter. Starting with these variants in individual promoters, the researchers identified a total of five different combinations, which cause different coat color patterns in dogs. “The manuals need to be rewritten because there are five of them instead of the four different models previously accepted in dogs,” says Leeb.

Unexpected insights into the evolution of wolves

As many wolf genomes from different regions of the earth became publicly available, the researchers further investigated whether the identified genetic variants also existed in wolves. These analyzes demonstrated that the ventral and hair-cycle-specific hyperactive promoter variants were already present in wolves before the domestication of modern dogs, which began about 40,000 years ago. Most likely, these genetic variants facilitated the adaptation of wolves with a lighter coat color to snow-rich environments during past ice ages. Today, completely white Arctic wolves and light-colored Himalayan wolves still carry these genetic variants.

Further comparisons of the gene sequences with other species of the Canidae family have given very surprising results. The researchers were able to show that the overactive variant of the specific hair cycle promoter in light-colored dogs and wolves shared more similarities with very distant species such as the golden jackal or coyote than with the European gray wolf.

“The only plausible explanation for this unexpected finding is an ancient origin of this variant, over two million years ago, in a now extinct relative of wolves,” Leeb says. The gene segment must have been introgressed over two million years ago into wolves by hybridization events with this now extinct parent of wolves. So a small piece of DNA from this extinct species is still found in yellow dogs and white arctic wolves today. “It is reminiscent of the spectacular discovery that modern humans carry a small proportion of DNA in their genomes from now extinct Neanderthals,” adds Leeb.

Reference: Bannasch DL, Kaelin CB, Letko A, et al. Dog color patterns explained by modular promoters of ancient canid origin. Nat Ecol Evol. 2021: 1-9. doi: 10.1038 / s41559-021-01524-x

This article was republished from the following materials. Note: The material may have been modified for its length and content. For more information, please contact the cited source.


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Archeology: the jawbone of a huge dog from 1.8 MILLION years ago with human remains in Georgia https://sotwmetal.com/archeology-the-jawbone-of-a-huge-dog-from-1-8-million-years-ago-with-human-remains-in-georgia/ https://sotwmetal.com/archeology-the-jawbone-of-a-huge-dog-from-1-8-million-years-ago-with-human-remains-in-georgia/#respond Thu, 29 Jul 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://sotwmetal.com/archeology-the-jawbone-of-a-huge-dog-from-1-8-million-years-ago-with-human-remains-in-georgia/ Is it the first hunting dog in Europe? Jawbone of huge 1.8 MILLION-year-old dog found next to human remains in Georgia Jawbone of young adult Eurasian hunting dog found in Dmanisi Experts have dated the dog’s remains around 1.77 to 1.76 million years ago This predates the widespread dispersal of hunting dogs from Asia to […]]]>

Is it the first hunting dog in Europe? Jawbone of huge 1.8 MILLION-year-old dog found next to human remains in Georgia

  • Jawbone of young adult Eurasian hunting dog found in Dmanisi
  • Experts have dated the dog’s remains around 1.77 to 1.76 million years ago
  • This predates the widespread dispersal of hunting dogs from Asia to Europe.
  • His findings also suggest dogs lived alongside early humans in Georgia.










The jawbone of a huge dog from 1.8 million years ago has been found next to human remains in Georgia – and may be Europe’s first hunting dog, study finds.

Experts from the University of Florence analyzed freshly collected remains from the archaeological site of Dmanisi, which previously yielded several hominid skulls.

They concluded that the remains belonged to the species Canis (Xenocyon) lycaonoides – the “Eurasian hunting dog” – native to East Asia.

The Dmanisi dog, according to the team, could be the ancestor of African hunting dogs – and likely lived alongside early humans in Georgia before dispersing more widely.

The jawbone of a huge dog from 1.8 million years ago has been found next to human remains in Georgia – and may be Europe’s first hunting dog, study finds. Pictured: An artist’s impression of a pack of Eurasian hunting dogs hunting for prey

The researchers concluded that the remains (pictured) belong to the species Canis (Xenocyon) lycaonoides the

The researchers concluded that the remains (pictured) belong to the species Canis (Xenocyon) lycaonoides – the “Eurasian hunting dog” – native to East Asia

ABOUT DMANISI

Dmanisi is an archaeological site in the Kvemo Kartli region of Georgia.

It dates back 1.8 million years and produced the first direct evidence of the first humans outside of Africa.

These specimens – including several skulls and four skeletons – have been identified as the earliest examples of the species Homo erectus.

The study of the remains of the large dog was undertaken by vertebrate paleontologist Saverio Bartolini-Lucenti of the University of Florence, Italy, and his colleagues.

According to their analysis, the bones date to between 1.77 and 1.76 million years ago, making it the first known case of hunting dogs in Europe.

According to the researchers, it actually predates the widespread movement of hunting dogs from their origin in Asia in the west to Europe and Africa in the mid-Pleistocene era.

Based on the dog’s lack of wear and tear on the Dmanisi dog’s teeth, the researchers concluded that it was a young adult, albeit tall, weighing around 30 kg (66 lbs).

Analysis of the dog’s dental characteristics also showed similarities with other wild dog-like species – the “canids” – of the same period.

They have narrower and shorter third bicuspids than omnivores and an enlarged, pointed “carnassial” tooth in the middle of the jaw that would have been used to shred food.

These characteristics have allowed experts to identify these canines as being very carnivorous, having a diet composed of at least 70% meat.

The Dmanisi dog, according to the team, could be the ancestor of African hunting dogs and likely lived alongside early humans in Georgia before dispersing more widely.  Pictured: An artist's impression of a group of Homo erectus who lived at the Dmanisi site

The Dmanisi dog, according to the team, could be the ancestor of African hunting dogs – and likely lived alongside early humans in Georgia before dispersing more widely. Pictured: An artist’s impression of a group of Homo erectus who lived at the Dmanisi site

Based on the dog's lack of wear and tear on the Dmanisi dog's teeth (pictured), the researchers concluded that it was a young adult, so tall, weighing around 30 kg (66 lbs).

Based on the dog’s lack of wear and tear on the Dmanisi dog’s teeth (pictured), the researchers concluded that it was a young adult, so tall, weighing around 30 kg (66 lbs).

“There is ample fossil evidence to suggest that this species was a cooperative hunter hunter,” the researchers wrote in their article.

“Unlike other large canids, [it] was able to care for both parent and non-parent members of her group.

The full results of the study were published in the journal Scientific Reports.

Experts from the University of Florence analyzed freshly collected remains from the archaeological site of Dmanisi, which previously yielded several hominid skulls.

Experts from the University of Florence analyzed freshly collected remains from the archaeological site of Dmanisi, which previously yielded several hominid skulls.

DOGS FIRST BECAME DOMESTIC AROUND 20,000 TO 40,000 YEARS AGO

A genetic analysis of the oldest known dog remains in the world revealed that dogs were domesticated in a single event by humans living in Eurasia around 20,000 to 40,000 years ago.

Dr Krishna Veeramah, assistant professor of evolution at Stony Brook University, told MailOnline: “The process of domestication of dogs was said to have been a very complex process, involving a number of generations in which the dog’s characteristic traits evolved. gradually.

“The current hypothesis is that the domestication of dogs probably occurred passively, with a wolf population somewhere in the world living on the outskirts of hunter-gatherer camps feeding on human-created waste.

“Those wolves that were more tame and less aggressive would have done better, and although humans initially did not benefit from this process, over time they would have developed a kind of symbiosis. [mutually beneficial] relationship with these animals, eventually evolving into the dogs we see today.

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