Aggressive coyote bites 1 and bites 3 others: AZ police

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Cape Cod National Seashore reports that rangers have responded to incidents of coyotes acting confidently towards people. An aggressive coyote lurking in an Arizona neighborhood attacked one person and bit three others, officials reported this week.

National Park Service Photo

An aggressive coyote lurking in an Arizona neighborhood attacked one person and bit three other residents, police said.

A 62-year-old woman was walking her dog in Prescott on Sunday morning when the wild animal bit her lower calf, the Prescott Police Department said in a press release.

She was treated for her minor injury and “possible exposure to rabies” at a local medical center, authorities said.

The coyote also bit three other people living in the Prescott Lakes Subdivision. Police said the animal had not bit anyone else.

Arizona Department of Fish and Game wildlife officials called the animal’s behavior “unusual” and they couldn’t find the coyote.

“Use extreme caution when walking around the Prescott Lakes Subdivision area, especially when walking pets,” police said in the statement.

Prescott is approximately 100 miles northwest of Phoenix. The town is near the Prescott National Forest.

What attracts coyotes?

Coyotes roam neighborhoods when there is food, water and shelter, according to the wildlife agency’s website.

Food can include pets, garbage, birds attracted to bird feeders, or fallen fruit.

The wildlife agency encourages the public to scare off coyotes so that they do not adapt to humans and lose their fear of them.

This includes making loud noises, keeping eye contact, hitting pans, waving hands or other objects, throwing small objects, spraying the animal with a hose, or crushing the coyote if it becomes “daring.”

If the animal continues to return, professional removal may be necessary.

Helena Wegner is a McClatchy National Real-Time Reporter covering Washington State and the Western United States. She graduated in journalism from the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State University. She is based in Phoenix.


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